Friday, June 13, 2014

Petition Demands Lady Gaga Stop “Glamourising Bulimia”

Petition Demands Lady Gaga Stop “Glamourising Bulimia”:



Petition Demands Lady Gaga Stop “Glamourising Bulimia”


Following criticism by singer Demi Lovato over acts performed in her recent SXSW concert, an online petition has called on Lady Gaga to “stop glamourising bulimia” and “end her professional relationship” with British “vomit artist” Millie Brown, and is quickly reaching its signature goal.

“Lady Gaga once struggled with bulimia, but now she is glamourising the eating disorder,” writes Chris Wolverton, who launched the petition. “Hundreds of young women die from eating disorders every year, and many of her fans are at an age where women begin to develop these disorders.”

“Lady Gaga needs to recognise the damage she could cause with [vomit] stunts… [and] stop using imagery that could trigger fans struggling with eating disorders!” Wolverton adds that what separates Gaga from other acts who incorporate vomiting for shock value is her status as a role model.

Gaga herself has remained uncharacteristically quiet towards her critics, including Lovato who took to Twitter to write, “Sad… As if we didn’t have enough people glamorizing eat[ing] disorders already… Bottom line, it’s not ‘cool’ or ‘artsy’ at all.” Brown however has been vocal on the matter.

“I believe in absolute freedom of expression. Challenging perceptions of art & beauty. If art is your communication it should not be censored,” wrote the artist on her Twitter page, in response to criticism levelled at her by Lovato and several other outlets over her endorsement of ‘bulimia chic.’

“[Gaga's] silence on this matter is what bothers me the most,” one signee wrote on the petition’s comments page. Launched earlier this week, the petition has amassed under 9,800 signatures, just 200 shy of it’s 10,000 signature goal. See clips of Gaga and Brown’s SXSW performance below.

Watch: Lady Gaga gets puked on during SXSW performance

Watch: Lady Gaga gets puked on during SXSW performance